Words worth waiting for

amomentcoverMy friend Kevin Pearce has just published A moment worth waiting for as an e-book.  It has no subtitle, very possibly because there is no way you could even begin to sum up the book’s contents in half a dozen or so words.  But perhaps if you did try, it might read: a young man’s peregrinations through the music of the early 1980s.  Except that the young man in question doesn’t confine himself to the 1980s, instead time-travelling here, there and everywhere as he traces lineages back as far as Music Hall and anticipates futures yet to happen.  Beginning with Vic Godard, ending with easy listening pianist Peter Skellern (whom Vic used to put ‘on his battered bone-armed record player’), and taking in along the way the ZE, Postcard, Rough Trade, Y and On-U Sound record labels, as well as any number of characters on, around and beyond those labels, it’s as much the mapping of the fruits of an individual voyage of discovery as a detailed account of how that individual made those discoveries – at times through a process of gradual absorption, more often by instinctively and gleefully seizing upon leads from music journalists, as well as the kind of chance encounters or intuitive leaps of faith which result from having a curious mind and a relentlessly hungry pair of ears.  In this respect it reminds me of Rachel Cohen’s wonderful book A chance meeting: intertwined lives of American writers and artists, which espoused a similar interest in unearthing what you might call cultural interconnectedness in the pre-internet age.

It’s also very much the journey and work of a lifetime.  The depth of the research – and / or recall – is amazing; key to the book is the contemporary music criticism upon which Kevin draws, so obviously influential in terms of his developing taste.  But those well-remembered moments of discovery are merely the beginning, and it’s the lifetime of subsequent listening and exploration which adds lightly disguised layers of retrospective understanding to each instance of musical epiphany.

With a cast of thousands and a no limits approach to the genres of music covered, even knowledgeable readers are likely to feel somewhat bewildered from time to time – perhaps there are too many leads, too many clues for any one reader to follow up on – but the tone of the writing remains engaging, generous and sure-footed.  The transitions backwards and forwards in time are likewise handled with ease, and the effect of the whole is to do what any great writing about music should – indeed, what those music journalists of the early 1980s did for Kevin himself – which is to make the reader wish to listen again with freshly syringed ears to the records they know, and make haste to track down those that have so far eluded them.  I came away with a long, long list of those.

Anyone with an interest in not just independent music of the 1980s, but the entire history of popular music, will learn something from – and find fascination in – every chapter of Kevin’s book.  Moments and words worth waiting for, indeed.

 

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2 responses

  1. Spot on Dan. What I love about Kevin’s writing in general, and in particular with this book is the way in which he leaps off on those tangents before returning to the centre. It’s perfectly timed – striding effortlessly along the highwire. Each sideways meander is neither too long that you forget where you started from nor so short that it is devoid of interest or meaning. And it’s one of those techniques that looks so effortless because it is so carefully crafted.

    1. Cheers Alistair – you’re spot on with your comment too.

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