45 45s #34 The Go-Betweens – Cattle and cane (Rough Trade, 1983)

The Go-Betweens‘His father’s watch
He left it in the shower
From time to time the waste – memory wastes’

A single that to my great and enduring shame cost me nothing.  I happened to be round at my friend Robert’s house while he was sorting through his record collection, deciding what he could part with to raise some much needed cash (this being not long after our student days).  He’d recently had his head turned by Talk Talk’s Laughing stock and was more quickly making his way into stretched-out avant-garde jazz and electronica than I was.  So when I voiced incredulity that he was parting with it, and that I’d have it if he didn’t want it, I guess I gave him no choice.  Rob being Rob, he wouldn’t take any money for it – that is, if I offered him any; my memory’s somewhat shaky on that point.

From its intro onwards, the song echoes down the years like the memories remembered within it.  ‘And the waste – memory wastes…’ sings Grant McLennan, poetically and clinically crystallising with that play on words what it is about recollecting our pasts – and in particular our childhoods – that is so affecting.  There’s a performance of the song on the That striped sunlight sound DVD, and in the context of Grant’s death the following year, it’s heart-breakingly poignant.  Grant’s not properly miked, so you have to strain a little to hear his vocal, but to see them playing this truly great song in the living room of one or the other of them, Robert Forster relaxed and urbane, Grant wry and ever so slightly on edge – to see the depth of their understanding and mutual admiration – well, it’s testament to a great friendship and a great band.  Faced with the first song of Grant’s to best his own efforts, Robert describes his epiphany: ‘He’d done childhood… why didn’t I think of that?’

Until I read David Nichols’ excellent book about the Go-Betweens, it had always seemed something of a mystery to me as to why Grant would allow Robert lyrical room within one of his most personal, deeply felt and memorable songs.  Here’s how Grant, speaking to Virginia Moncrieff in 1983, explains it:

‘I don’t like the word nostalgic, to me it’s a sloppy yearning for the past, and I’m not trying to do that in that song.  I’m just trying to put three vignettes of a person, who’s a lot like myself, growing up in Queensland, and just juxtaposing that against how I am now, and that’s the reason why at the end of the song I asked Robert to do four lines, of his impressions, of me and what the song’s about, and that’s why his voice comes in at the end of the song.’

So the singing of the song is not just a telling of the memories of childhood, but a sharing of them, and sharing leads to conversation, and Robert chips in with what he recalls, and it serves to give the song still more emotional weight, and to induce you to remember your own childhood, your relationship with your own father, and to want to share that too.

I recall… the week he came back, the house was filled with unfamiliar smells, it had been so long.  In the mornings, aftershave and marmalade on toast.  In the evenings, cigarettes extinguished in the toilet and whisky and dry.  It seemed a miracle that he was there at all, given all the previous, the fortnightly Saturday afternoon wrangles.  It lasted no longer than a week…

In one of the vignettes, Grant famously sings about leaving his father’s watch in the shower.  The early death of his father is the unspoken and haunting subtext of the song (and of another song on Before Hollywood, ‘Dusty in here’), and the heft of its sadness has only broadened as a result of Grant’s own early death.  But it’s not simply a sorrowful song; there’s warmth in there too, which adds to its unique and enduring appeal.  Written in London on Nick Cave’s guitar in 1982, it forcibly brought Australia to mind for its writer.  As he says on That striped sunlight sound, ‘it carried sunshine in it’.

PS Rob, if you’d like the record back, it’s yours the next time we meet up.  Might be worth a bob or two more now.

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